The Battle of Belmont: Soldiers in both Armies

Cairo, Illinois. http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/civil-war/1861/june/cairo-illinois.jpg

Cairo, Illinois. http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/civil-war/1861/june/cairo-illinois.jpg

One of the most interesting and least discussed battles in the Civil War came in 1861, at Belmont, Missouri. While the battle did not have a clear victor or any strategic implications, it is home to one of the best stories of Illinois in the Civil War. At Belmont lies the tale of a small community in Marion, Williamson County, Illinois. Neighbors, friends, and family lined up against each other just months after the firing at Ft. Sumter.

Assured that his brother-in-law, John A. Logan will meet up with him at Union City, Tennessee, 25 year old Hibert “Hibe” Cunningham set out for the Confederate Army. After weeks went by and still no word from Logan, Hibe discovered  a newspaper in Columbus, Missouri, that stated his brother-in-law had indeed raised his own regiment; however, it was for the Union and not the Confederacy as Hibe had planned. Many of the men in the Company G of the 15th Tennessee had known Logan personally in their community, or had at the very least voted for him as their Congressmen. To the members of the Southern Illinois Company the news came as a shock. Unbeknownst to them they would have their chance to see Logan in just two months, at the Battle of Belmont. (Gleeson p. 18-50)